August 15, 2014

ISBA 2014 titles

Some interesting talks and posters from the upcoming International Symposium on Biomolecular Archaeology. I don't see any abstracts on the site (yet?) but the titles are intriguing. Some that caught my eye:

  • Investigating the maternal lineage diversity from an early medieval site in Southern Italy
  • Ancient mitochondrial and Y chromosomal DNA reveals the western Carpathian Basin as a corridor of the Neolithic expansion
  • Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the Northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the dispersion process
  • The effect of demography and natural selection on pigmentation heterogeneity in late Pleistocene and early Holocene Europeans
  • The genomics of equine speciation and domestication
  • Ancient population genetics: new insights on horse domestication
  • Species identification and analysis of the Tyrolean Iceman's clothes using next generation sequencing of ancient DNA.
  • Early evidence for the use of pottery: extending the ancient lipid record to the Pleistocene.
  • Whey to go – first identification of lactose in prehistoric pottery
  • Use of the earliest pottery on the Western and Eastern side of the Baltic
  • The geographical distribution of the Polynesian cultural complex and its association with P33-C2a1 Y chromosomes: adding data from Aotearoa (New Zealand)
  • Interdisciplinary investigation of an archaic hominin femur from the Swabian Jura (South-West Germany)
  • Tracing the genetic history of farming populations of El Portalón Cave in the Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain.
  • Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans
  • Ancient DNA from Early Neolithic farmers in Europe
  • Genomic diversity and admixture in Stone-Age farmer and hunter-gatherer groups in Scandinavia
  • Ancient DNA reveals the complex genetic history of the New World Arctic
  • A prediction of the hybridisation potential between Hominin species using mitochondrial DNA
  • Population Genomics of Vikings
  • Tracing the genetic profile of Sus scrofa on Romanian territory from the Neolithic period until the Middle Ages
  • The origins of the Aegean palatial civilizations from a population genetic perspective
  • Ancient DNA evidence for a diversified origin of ancestor of Han Chinese

6 comments:

Alberto said...

Looks like we'll get a lot of new data from these talks. Very interesting!

For me the biggest unanswered question regarding neolithic migrations into Europe is if there was one door only (from Anatolia to Greece) or if there were 2 doors, the second one from north west Africa to south west Europe. This second door has always been suggested, but never really proved or studied in depth. That talk about 3 ancestral populations for present day Europe might shed some light on it (plus a few other talks too, like the one about Atapuerca farmers).

Talks regarding the domestication of horses might give new data about Indo-European migrations in the Bronze Age too (though no title suggests we'll get new info about the origins of R1b yet...)

Dr Rob said...

Hope they all get published soon. Even those from 2012 are still waiting ...

barakobama said...

Holy, Shit I had no idea so many people are sampling ancient DNA. There are many interesting titles.

Vincent said...

Dienekes, 16 days ago a new study on Y-DNA and mtDNA in West Timor has been published. Here's the link: http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/jhg201462a.html

terryt said...

Thanks. Fascinating. Regarding SE Asian D I notice they write:

"A small number of Timorese Y chromosomes belong to haplogroups other than lineages C, K, M, S and O. A total of ~0.6% belong to haplogroups D-M116, E-P1 and Q-P36, with the D group possibly reflecting wartime connections with Japan".

The D-M116 under the new phylogeny is D1b1, definitely a Japanese haplogroup. Another interesting comment in the paper:

"Haplogroup J-M172, potentially a signal of Arab trader contact, is found at very low frequency (0.4%) in Timor and is also shared with Sulawesi (0.6%)".

Concerning the subject matter of the post the title I am most interested in is of course, 'The geographical distribution of the Polynesian cultural complex and its association with P33-C2a1 Y chromosomes: adding data from Aotearoa (New Zealand)'. Others being, 'A prediction of the hybridisation potential between Hominin species using mitochondrial DNA' and 'Ancient DNA evidence for a diversified origin of ancestor of Han Chinese'.

ZeGrammarNazi said...

Here is the project description for the title "The origins of the Aegean palatial civilizations from a population genetic perspective":

http://rescom.duth.gr/sites/default/files/81319-5567_5-3-2014_%CE%91%CE%93%CE%93%CE%9B%CE%99%CE%9A%CE%9F.pdf

Looks like this one might be awesome. A quote:

"In addition to mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal DNA, by applying a capture-NGS approach we plan to produce kilobases of ancient DNA from all samples producing useable extracts.
This approach will allow us to collect information on functional traits of the early Aegean communities in
southeastern Europe."