November 27, 2009

Y chromosomes of Andalusians from Huelva

Annals of Human Biology

The Andalusian population from Huelva reveals a high diversification of Y-DNA paternal lineages from haplogroup E: Identifying human male movements within the Mediterranean space.

B. Ambrosio et al.

Abstract

Gene flow among human populations is generally interpreted in terms of complex patterns, with the observed gene frequencies being the consequence of the entire genetic and demographic histories of the population. Aims: This study performs a high-resolution analysis of the Y-chromosome haplogroup E in Western Andalusians (Huelva province). The genetic information presented here provides new insights into migration processes that took place throughout the Mediterranean space and tries to evaluate its impact on the current genetic composition of the most southwestern population of Spain. Subjects and methods: 167 unrelated males were previously typed for the presence/absence of the Y-chromosome Alu polymorphism (YAP). The group of YAP (+) Andalusians was genotyped for 16 Y-SNPs and also characterized for 16 Y-STR loci. Results: The distribution of E-M81 haplogroup, a Berber marker, was found at a frequency of 3% in our sample. The distribution of M81 frequencies in Iberia seems to be not concordant with the regions where Islamic rule was most intense and long-lasting. The study also showed that most of M78 derived allele (6.6%) led to the V13* subhaplogroup. We also found the most basal and rare paragroup M78* and others with V12 and V65 mutations. The lineage defined by M34 mutation, which is quite frequent in Jews, was detected as well. Conclusions: The haplogroup E among Western Andalusians revealed a complex admixture of genetic markers from the Mediterranean space, with interesting signatures of populations from the Middle East and the Balkan Peninsula and a surprisingly low influence by Berber populations compared to other areas of the Iberian Peninsula.

Link

5 comments:

Andrew Lancaster said...

Link not working?

aargiedude said...

The distribution of E-M81 haplogroup, a Berber marker, was found at a frequency of 3% in our sample. The distribution of M81 frequencies in Iberia seems to be not concordant with the regions where Islamic rule was most intense and long-lasting.

I made a detailed analysis of M81 in Iberia about a year ago. You can see that M81 has an east-west gradient, not north-south as would be expected from a historic origin due to the Moors. The 2nd graph also shows that the M81 samples in the western coast have a higher diversity than those in the eastern half of Iberia, reenforcing the conclusion.

M81 in Iberia (7200 samples)

Variance of M81 in Iberia

aargiedude said...

The map doesn't include some more recent results from yhrd:

Alpujarra de la Sierra had 1/50 M81, or 2% M81. It's in the southeast corner of Spain, in the map it's just east of Cartagena.
Valencia added another 59 samples, 2 of which were M81, or 3% M81. For all you Americans [ :) ], Valencia is in the centereast of Iberia (you can see it on the map).
Baleares Islands added another 187 samples, 4 of which were M81, or 2% M81.

All these recent results reflect perfectly the previous estimates.

The results from this new study for Huelva (bordering south Portugal) are somewhat on the low side for this region, but we already have way more than enough results for western Iberia. It's the eastern part that's somewhat lacking, especially the southeastern quarter of Iberia, so those extra results I outlined above are pretty helpful.

Ponto said...

The non concordance of genetic markers, in this case Y chromosome haplogroups and subclades, with recorded history has been highlighted before in previous studies of Spanish populations. Galicia is a particular example. The distribution of mtDNA U6 in the Iberian peninsula is another anomaly.

It is a no brainer that simplistic deductions of the original populations and immigration events of Europe based on present day distribution of haplogroups, and subclades do little to eludicate the true population events of Europe. North African, Middle Eastern or European haplogroups, that the ones most common and frequent in those geographies now, may have origins in other regions or entered Europe, North Africa or the Middle East at the same time from various sources i.e Africa. It is just too simple to say one haplogroup or subclade is Berber or North African based on the frequencies of today. We can do that for the presence of J1, J2, E1b1b, R1b, R1a and many other haplogroups in the Americas or Oceania, but not for Europe.

GrIQ said...

The E-M81 has nothing to do with Islamic rule.
The E-M81 in Iberia comes from 5000 BCE, in pre-Neolithic times.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/Spread_hg_E.gif