January 25, 2009

Magyars and Madjars

American Journal of Physical Anthropology doi:10.1002/ajpa.20984

A Y-chromosomal comparison of the Madjars (Kazakhstan) and the Magyars (Hungary)

A.Z. Bíró et al.

Abstract

The Madjars are a previously unstudied population from Kazakhstan who practice a form of local exogamy in which wives are brought in from neighboring tribes, but husbands are not, so the paternal lineages remain genetically isolated within the population. Their name bears a striking resemblance to the Magyars who have inhabited Hungary for over a millennium, but whose previous history is poorly understood. We have now carried out a genetic analysis of the population structure and relationships of the Madjars, and in particular have sought to test whether or not they show a genetic link with the Magyars. We concentrated on paternal lineages because of their isolation within the Madjars and sampled males representing all extant male lineages unrelated for more than eight generations (n = 45) in the Torgay area of Kazakhstan. The Madjars show evidence of extensive genetic drift, with 24/45 carrying the same 12-STR haplotype within haplogroup G. Genetic distances based on haplogroup frequencies were used to compare the Madjars with 37 other populations and showed that they were closest to the Hungarian population rather than their geographical neighbors. Although this finding could result from chance, it is striking and suggests that there could have been genetic contact between the ancestors of the Madjars and Magyars, and thus that modern Hungarians may trace their ancestry to Central Asia, instead of the Eastern Uralic region as previously thought.

Link

7 comments:

hjernespiser said...

"and thus that modern Hungarians may trace their ancestry to Central Asia"

The Madjars (Mazsars) are supposedly descendants of ancient Magyar tribes who remained in the east around Volga Bulgaria, were absorbed into the Golden Horde, and distributed into one of the Kazakh founding tribes. This study seems to confirm that theory, but I doubt such a bold conclusion about modern Hungarians can be made from it. Mazsars are also found in western Mongolia where they haven't quite fully assimilated into the Kazakh identity.

BlaiseVillaume said...

So are you contending that the Madjars and Magyars have share an antecedent ancestor outside of their respective modern locations? Or that there is no such common ancestor?

hjernespiser said...

"So are you contending that the Madjars and Magyars have share an antecedent ancestor outside of their respective modern locations?" Yes. The abstract says "thus...modern Hungarians may trace their ancestry to Central Asia". That statement is based upon the assumption that the Madjars have stayed in the same place. It's like saying that the Madjars may trace their ancestry to Europe.

hjernespiser said...

It's like saying that the Madjars may trace their ancestry to Europe. Most would reject that interpretation because it is known from history that modern Hungarians are descendants from tribes that came from somewhere east. If the writers understood Golden Horde history, they'd equally reject the notion that Madjars have stayed in place.

BlaiseVillaume said...

Alright, I just wanted to clarify that. I think there is a lack of knowledge as to plain old history in some of these anthropology papers. I don't understand how else anybody could suggest that any people were stationary in the steppes.

nemsoha said...

I understand what you say about it being the same as claiming they can trace their origin back to Europe, however when you take into account traditional Hungarian history that says Magyars were from the same group as the Huns (many Chinese scholars also support this such as Wang Shiping, Lin Gan, Wang Zu, etc.), I'd say it's entirely possible that they are from Central Asia, especially given that the Uralic theory is so weak and is hardly accepted by most scholars today. I don't think it has to necessarily have something to do with the Golden Horde. Even the Csango are Magyars who split from the others on their way into Hungary, and don't forget the Szekely who settled there even earlier than Arpad. They're all the same people.

Ádám said...

Zsolt András Biró is not a real scientist, he doesn't have even a PHD. He is political supporter of the Jobbik party, and leader of the Hungarian Turan Society, which is famous for the spread of fringle theories and pseudo-science.


Read about the "Hungarian Turanism" in English Wikipedia.


The name of the "Madjar people" means "faithful muslim"